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Documents

Toxic Chemicals in Plastic Waste Poisoning People in Africa, Asia, Central and Eastern Europe & Latin America.

IPEN & Arnika, June 2021

Plastics and food packaging contain chemical contaminants from manufacturing along with many additives to make them inflammable, more flexible, grease-resistant, or sterile, as well as other substances to create many other properties. Many of these additives are toxic and they leak from products during use and can be released during recycling and from recycled products.

This study focuses on persistent organic pollutants (POPs), whose releases are closely related to plastic wastes. The POPs include additives in the plastic as such, as well as unintentionally produced POPs (UPOPs) generated mostly by burning, incineration and/or other thermal treatment of plastics. 

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Aquatic Pollutants in Oceans and Fisheries

IPEN & NTN | April 2021

Chemicals are polluting oceans and waterways, not only endangering wildlife and those who rely on seafood for sustenance, but threatening the collapse of many fisheries. In combination with global warming, this is a catastrophe in the making. This report is the first to begin to detail the numerous ways and places in which chemical pollution and climate change is destabilizing this marine infrastructure and the world's fisheries. We still have time to stop the destruction, but as this report indicates, we will need to go beyond thinking only about how to control overfishing or manage pollutants in the fish we consume. Our survival, along with that of all other species, will depend on ensuring the health of the entire ocean, an objective we all must work on together to achieve.

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Plastic's Toxic Additives and the Circular Economy

IPEN | September 2020

Toxic chemicals of concern that are widespread in common plastic products can hinder the momentum for a circular economy. A new report, coordinated by the Barcelona-based(1) Regional Activity Centre for Sustainable Consumption and Production (SCP/RAC), serving both the Stockholm Convention and the Barcelona Convention, has been produced in collaboration with the International Pollutants Elimination Network (IPEN) in order to shine a light on extensive evidence of toxic chemical components in plastics that can harm human and environmental health and impede a safe circular economy.

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Dealing with Industrial Contamination: Problems and solutions from Thailand and a call to action

March 2020

The condition of Thailand's natural and social environment entered a crisis in 1990s, which resulted in major amendments to national laws concerning environment and pollution control in 1992.
 

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Call for a global ban policy on and scientific management of asbestos to eliminate asbestos-related diseases

Journal of Public Health Policy, March 2020 | Achyut Aryal and Craig Morley

Asbestos is a primary cause of cancer worldwide. Global estimates indicate workplace exposure of 125 million people and about 255,000 deaths each year. Of the approximately 300 million metric tonnes of asbestos ever produced worldwide, most will become waste and disposed of in landfills. The recycling and transforming asbestos fibre into a non-harmful product offer a sustainable solution, but a global commitment remains elusive. Urgent action is needed. 

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Lead in Playground Equipment in Thailand

IPEN & EARTH, October 2019

On 30 September 2019, EARTH visited Benjakitti Park and Lumphini Park located in Bangkok City, Thailand, and screened the playground equipment for lead content. In each playground, painted play equipment and the condition of painted surface were documented.  This study shows that 20 out of 24 analyzed pieces of playground equipment contained total lead concentrations above 90 parts per million (ppm), dry weight. In addition, 14 analyzed pieces of playground equipment contained dangerously high lead levels above 10,000 ppm.; 15 out of 16 bright-colored painted surfaces contained lead concentra­tions above 90 ppm, dry weight; and the highest lead concentration detected was 72,300 ppm in a red monkey bar at a public playground in Benjakitti Park, Bangkok.

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Trading Away Health and the Environment: The Toxic Business of Waste Imports into Thailand

Co-Authors: Tanya Lee Roberts-Davis & Penchom Saetang

Ecological Alert and Recovery - Thailand (EARTH) | June 2019

Trading Away Health and the Environment provides an overview of the devastating impacts on the health and well-being of communities in Thailand where industrial waste processing facilities are being developed as part of an ongoing expansion of the transnational business of plastic and used electronics waste and scraps.

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Toxic Hot Spots in Thailand

Authors: Jindřich Petrlík, Alice Dvorská, Václav Mach, Marek Šír, Jitka Straková, Akarapon Teebthaisong, Jana Tremlová, Peter A. Behnisch, Martin Bystrianský, Autthaporn Ritthichat, Penchom Saetang

By Arnika Association and Ecological Alert and Recovery - Thailand (EARTH) | December 2018

The data presented in the studies were obtained during sampling campaigns in Thailand in February 2015, February and March 2016, and February 2017. The sampling campaigns represent an important part of the project “Increasing Transparency in Industrial Pollution Management through Citizen Science.”

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Evaluation of passive air sampler measurements close to the Map Ta Phut industrial estate, Thailand

Author: Alice Dvorská, Ph.D., | December 2018

Passive samplers are chemical accumulators that can be used to assess ambient concentrations in either homogeneous or heterogeneous media into which they are deployed. They are increasingly employed in investigations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) (Shoeib and Harner, 2002). There are various PAS sampling media and designs used. In contrast to high-cost active air samplers, passive air samplers (PAS) do not require pumps, sampling heads and a source of electricity. They are inexpensive and small and therefore increasingly used for POPs monitoring and spatial studies at local, regional and continental scales (Pozo et al., 2009 and references therein).

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"We Fight to Protect Our Home:” Reprisals Against Environmental Defenders in Loei Province, Thailand

A report by Fortify Rights, October 2018

This report reveals that Thai authorities and Tungkum Ltd. committed and contributed to serious human rights violations and abuses against members of KRBKG and environmental defenders in Wang Sa Phung District, Loei Province. Violations and abuses include the arbitrary detention of human rights defenders and violations of the rights to freedom of expression, peaceful assembly, a healthy environment.

Local residents in affected communities surrounding the gold  mine largely rely on farming and the natural environment for their livelihoods and sustenance. Water and soil pollution has adversely impacted their daily lives and livelihoods. Residents have also complained about health conditions...

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Chicken eggs as an indicator of POPs pollution in Thailand

Author: RNDr. Jindrich Petrlik

Supporting data: Akarapon Teebthaisong, Atthaporn Ritthichat

Bangkok, Prague, November 2017

In this study, we present the results of monitoring free-range chicken eggs from selected sites in Thailand which are contaminated by persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Free-range chicken eggs were used for monitoring levels of contamination by POPs in various locations in many previous studies. Eggs have been found to be sensitive indicators of POP contamination in soils or dust and are a significant exposure pathway from soil pollution to humans. 

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News

Waste not, want not

Bangkok Post 02 August 2021 | Suwitcha Chaiyong

Environmental groups are urging the Thai government to stop importing other countries' toxic garbage

"E-waste contains heavy metals and plastic, which contain toxic components. If waste management is not controlled properly, hazardous components, which contain carcinogens, can be released into the environment," said Penchom Saetang, director of Ecological Alert and Recovery Thailand (EARTH).

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Probe urged for permit allowing for Ming Dih Chemical to increase production capacity

Thai PBS World 13 July 2021

Thailand’s Industry Minister Suriya Jungrungreangkit has been urged, by an environmental advocacy group known as Ecological Alert and Recovery – Thailand (EARTH), to investigate why Ming Dih Chemical, whose factory exploded last week, was allowed to increase its production capacity of Styrofoam pellets, despite the fact that it is surrounded by communities and is not far from Suvarnabhumi International Airport.

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PRESS CONFERENCE (in Thai): Ming Dih Factory Blaze & Aftermath

PRESS CONFERENCE (in Thai): 13 July 2021 | Organised by EARTH

You are invited for the press conference organised by EARTH. We will submit the demand to the Minister of Industry to prosecute the offenders in the case of the chemical explosion and a fire at the factory of #MingDih Chemical Co., Ltd. which caused death and more than 60 people injured. Moreover, it incident also caused toxic pollution in a large area and damaged houses and people's properties the nearby neighbourhood.

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Blast sends stiff message

Bangkok post 11 July 2021 | Pratch Rujivanarom

Hazardous substance laws have barely improved since last tragedy

Thirty years after the deadly blast at a chemical storage venue at Klong Toey Port, the recent explosion at a plastic pellets factory is a wakeup call that Thailand's laws to regulate hazardous substances have not improved much from three decades ago, academics say.

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Ratify the Basel Convention Ban Amendment, End Toxic Waste Imports

EARTH 25 June 2021

Representatives from environmental NGO Ecological Alert Recovery – Thailand (EARTH) submitted letters to the Minister of Natural Resources and Environment and the Minister of Industry, calling on the Thai government to ratify the Basel Convention Ban Amendment, which will end the imports of toxic plastic wastes and e-wastes into the country and for government agencies to strictly regulate dirty recycling industries that cause pollution.

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Rayong’s hazmat processing company demanded ฿1.3 billion for environmental damage

Thai PBS World 17 June 2021

Pollution Control Department is demanding that a hazardous waste processing and recycling company in Rayong province pay compensation of more than 1.3 billion baht for damage caused to the environment and a community near its factory within 15 days, or face litigation.

Founded in 2010, Win Process engages in the business of sorting and recycling hazardous waste. Its factory is located in Village 4, Bang But sub-district of Ban Khai district of Rayong province.

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Nong Phawa villagers sue Win Process company demanding environmental restoration and compensation for agricultural losses

PRESS RELEASE | EARTH  07 June 2021

The villagers of Nong Phawa sue Win Process company for releasing pollutants into local waterways, causing widespread damage to local environments and farmlands. The villagers demand polluters compensate for the damage they cause and be held responsible for restoring the environment to its original condition.

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Anti-hazardous waste campaigners call for an end to hazardous waste exports and “dirty recycling” worldwide

Bangkok Tribune 05 June 2021  

In recognition of World Environment Day, global anti-hazardous waste campaigners from EARTH and Czech based Arnika have called for an end to global hazardous waste exports and  recycling industries which they brand as “dirty” through the “universal” ratification of the Basel Ban Amendment

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Environmental NGOs call for hazardous waste exports and “dirty recycling” to end worldwide

4 June 2021 | Press release of Arnika and EARTH 

BANGKOK/PRAGUE – In recognition of World Environment Day 2021, the NGOs EARTH (1,3) and Arnika (2,3) have called for an end to hazardous waste exports and dirty recycling industries through the universal ratification of the Basel Ban Amendment (4). As the world enters the UN decade of ecosystem restoration, pollution from dirty recycling continues to devastate local environments and health around the world. Without universal ratification of the Basel Ban Amendment, this problem will continue.

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The Fate of “Nam Pu Subdistrict” and the Connection to Toxic Industrial Pollution Under the Guise of “Recycling”

Special Report by EARTH | October 2020

On April 11, 2017, the "Nam Pu subdistrict" made headlines in many media outlets as three local representatives from Nam Pu subdistrict, Muang district, in Ratchaburi province, filed a lawsuit against the Wax Garbage Recycle Center Company Limited for violating the Environmental Quality and Promotion Act 1992. The company has operated nine factories, along with a recycling shop called “Pong Charoen”, within a total area of approximately 300 rai (one rai is equal to 0.16 hectares) located next to Nam Pu creek, which is the main water source for the local people in Nam Pu subdistrict and the vicinity for both household consumption and agricultural purposes.

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Chemical Pollution Causes Fish Declines

PRESS RELEASE: IPEN & NTN | 27 April 2021

Escalating Chemical Production Threatens Aquatic Food Chain

GOTHENBURG, SWEDEN - Increasing levels of chemical and plastic pollution are major contributors to declines in the world’s fish populations and other aquatic organisms, according to a new report released today. The report is the first to bring together in one place the latest scientific research demonstrating how chemical pollution is adversely impacting the aquatic food chain that supports all life on earth.

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Thais affected by heavy industries are calling for a closer monitoring of polluters

EARTH & ARNIKA 06 April 2021

BANGKOK / PRAGUE - Pollution of air, soil and food chain reach extreme levels in Thailand, as shown by the long term measurements conducted by environmental organizations Ecological Alert and Recovery Thailand (EARTH) and Arnika (1). NGOs and communities affected now ask the authorities to introduce a mandatory system to monitor emissions of harmful substances from industrial plants and factories. Data should be reported in a Pollutant Release and Transfer Register (PRTR) - an effective mechanism of public control that has proved its worth in reducing pollution in European countries and has contributed to the safety of communities.

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Klity Creek lead cleanup stumbles

Bangkok Post 28 February 2021 | Nicha Wachpanich

Long-running environmental saga no closer to a happy resolution

Pollution in Klity Creek in the deep forest of Kanchanaburi province has been a health and environmental threat for villagers who relied for water consumption for decades. Three years ago, authorities launched a cleanup -- the first state-supervised environmental cleanup in Thailand. This series aims to explore how it is going.

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Locals voice protest against gold exploration in Chanthaburi province

Thai PBS World 10 February 2021

A network of about 40 civic groups and local organizations in Thailand’s eastern province of Chanthaburi is voicing strong opposition to the granting of approval for gold exploration by a mining company.

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Locals secure victory over plastics firm

Bangkok Post 25 December 2020

Company to restore damaged areas

Residents of a village in tambon Nam Phu of Ratchaburi's Muang district have won a court battle with a plastic recycling company that was found to have polluted the local environment which negatively impacted their health.

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